Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Beat Musings 1995


More video. [2012 update, unfortunately the segment that was the subject of this post has been pulled]This surprisingly-sympathetic mainstream-media CBS News, Sunday Morning segment (timed to coincide with the 1995 Lisa Phillips-curated “Beat Culture and the New America” show) has Richard Threllkald, CBS correspondent, interviewing Allen alongside Michael McClure. “Beat” is, retrospectively, defined as, “an overflowing of exuberance and good will”. Beat culture “wasn’t so much a rebellion as a proposition how to live”. Of contemporaneous times (1995): “They say the new generation is alienated, slacker, apathetic, deadened of feeling when actually there is an enormous amount of feeling underneath, which needs to be invoked, empowered and appreciated”.

McClure is shown making a pilgrimage to the site of the Six Gallery (“it’s still a gallery, (but) now it’s a gallery for tribal arts”) and to City Lights, and to the spot in San Francisco where he lived in the ‘60’s and where Jay DeFeo painted/constructed her remarkable work, The Rose.

Only the hawk-eyed will be able to pick out Gregory Corso in this footage (not to mention Ted Joans and Michael Rumaker), only momentary glimpses of them, confessedly, but, we assure you, they’re there.

3 comments:

  1. I remember seeing this that very morning, because later that day I attended the final day of the Hollywood (Fl) Jazz Festival and saw Gerry Mulligan and Roy Haynes play.

    Putting it mildly, it was a thrill knowing that millions in mainstream America would see that brief scene of Neal Cassady in that black & white footage.

    BTW, I'm having to wait a long time in order to load this blog. Perhaps if you could reduce the amount of posts displayed on each page? I love this place and would visit and comment more if it weren't such a struggle to view the (always incredible) content.

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  2. thanks for pointing that out Dexter. I've been told of similar issues recently, so lemme change it so only a couple load per page. Cheers, Peter

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