Friday, March 11, 2011

Friday's Weekly Round-Up 16


[photo/ephemera collage by Althea Crawford for Holy Soul Jelly Roll box set insert]

Bibliographic Notes

The current presence of Howl the movie has summoned up a few complimentary bibliographic articles. Gilliam Orr in The Independent proposes a reading list that begins, as everybody would suggest, with the poem itself, followed by such titles as, James Campbell’s overview, This Is The Beat Generation, Ronna C Johnson & Nancy M Grace’s Girls Who Wore Black, and Harold Chapman’s photographic documentation, which, as they carefully note, is “currently out of print”

An equally maverick selection was proposed last year by Courtney Crowder in the Chicago Tribune. Taking for granted the poem itself as the starting point, she recommends Bill Morgan’s biography, I Celebrate Myself: The Somewhat Private Life of Allen Ginsberg; the Ginsberg-Kerouac letters; Susan Edwards’ book-length memoir, The Wild West Wind: Remembering Allen Ginsberg; and Chris Felver’s photo book, The Late Great Allen Ginsberg

This, to quote our friend Michael McClure is just “scratching the.. surface”

Cinematic Notes

Another Allen on Film – Ruth Du’s short, Six’55 (featuring Roger Massih as Allen) - “a historical interpretation of the first night Allen Ginsberg recited his famous “Howl” in the Six Gallery in San Francisco in 1955” - just won the prize for “best undergraduate cinematography” at NYU’s Fusion Film Festival.

Lawrence Kramen's

"David Amram: The First 80 Years!" gets a "sneak preview" this weekend in Lowell

and - didn't we mention? don't think we did - footage from last year's Peter Orlovsky Memorial at St Mark's Church is now up on The Poetry Project's web-site (actually, it's been there now a good long while!)


Kerouac at Lowell


Yes, Lowell - don't forget Jack Kerouac's birthday tomorrow! (Saturday March 12th) - His home-town is once again celebrating with a birthday-bash. As acknowledgment of the 75th anniversary of the 1936 Lowell Flood, there'll be readings from Doctor Sax, (wherein he describes the flood,

as he remembered it, still a boy, only 14 years old). There'll be a showing of the film Whatever Happened to Kerouac?, and an evening of jazz and blues - and poetry - at The Back Pages Jazz and Blues Club,"an evening of words, music and improv", hosted by, and featuring David Amram
Amram notes:
"Kerouac was one of the first writers to understand the relationship of Formality and Spontaneity, and how the treasures of the Old World (the classics of Europe) had a relationship to the treasures of the New World (USA jazz, blues. Native and Latin American and Immigrant American musical forms that combined tradition with improvising. Growing up in Lowell, he had a sense of community, family, the church, the beauty of everyday life and respect for every person who crossed his path; especially people that entered the gyroscope of his life, wherever he went in his endless travels. He never lost his hometown roots or relinquished his values in order to attempt to be cutting edge or trendy. Like all great artists, he followed his heart and
remained true to himself"



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